Daughter of a New York Taxi driver

My dad has been driving a yellow cab around NYC for the past twenty-five years. The yellow vehicle has become his second home; even though it’s a color I despise. He came to the US when he was twenty years old with approximately 100 dollars in his pocket. He has his own James Bond story, which includes dodging agents, sailing oceans and getting shot in the head. He’s my superhero- only when he doesn’t complain.

He knows every inch of the city by heart even the weird passages that are used for short cuts. He even knows which part of the city is crowded at what time. If he was in fast and furious, he’d probably win. He’s like a living GPS. Instead of using google maps I ask him for directions, and I can guarantee that I get to my destination faster than a GPS. He even talks about the city in his sleep.

But driving in the city isn’t always easy. You meet rude, obnoxious people. My dad is patient, very patient. He stays calm. I’m the opposite of him. Let’s just say if I was in his position I would most likely end up in jail.

Dad comes home and tells us all his crazy stories. Once he met some celebrity, but he doesn’t watch Tv or listen to music, so he didn’t know who he met. Once a couple in his cab started fighting which escalated and he was caught in between.

But him being a taxi driver scares me. Besides the fact that New Yorkers are crazy, my dad is in debt. He’s in so much debt that even if he works overtime for the rest of his life, he can’t pay off his debt. The taxi medallion at one point was worth 6,00,000. Dad gathered all his savings and used it for a loan so he could get his own taxi. Because of Uber and lyft the prices of the Medallion have gone down and now it’s worth only 2,00,000. Meaning the money, he’s paying back the bank is going down the drain.

There are so many taxi drivers that have committed suicide, because they were unable to pay for the medallion. Every time I look at my dad, something in my stomach churns. My dad is a very jolly and optimistic person, and he doesn’t worry. But I still ask him every day how work was, how the people were, and how’s he holding up. Knowing that someone cares about you and is standing behind you makes all the difference. He’s always been there for me and now I want to be there for him.

32 thoughts on “Daughter of a New York Taxi driver

  1. Thank you for sharing such a heartfelt story of your loving & patient father….his strength is his nature….the deeper contact….it’s lovely, you’re there for him….have you thought of writing down & sharing his stories….life experience of his own & what’s going on in his passengers mind….the conversations….from a different perspective….just a suggestion 🙏 ✨

    Liked by 2 people

  2. You’re an amazing daughter of an amazing father. InshaAllah, everything will work out and may Allah grant him ease and always always always keep your family happy. 🤗💖

    Liked by 2 people

  3. funny…I can’t stand yellow either, especially the yellow cab shade! What happened to your Dad’s medallion should never have been allowed but it’s because people aren’t able to think, at least not about anyone but themselves, As long as they can make money, what do they care if it ruins someone else. God bless your Dad and may fate swing the other way so he can rid himself of the debt. These days, it seems, anything can happen!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. I love that you shared this story… I was fully invested and wanted to read more… it’s unfortunate how terrible our economy is. I’m a new follower and can’t wait to read more!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for stopping by. My dad still drives a taxi. It’s a second home for him now! I’ve started a blog for him… where we write all his funny and unfortunate moments as a cab driver.

      Like

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